Louisiana Couple Convicted of Bankruptcy Fraud and Money Laundering

October 23rd, 2012 by Reed Allmand

Louisiana Couple Convicted of Bankruptcy Fraud and Money Laundering

Shreveport businessman Harold L. Rosbottom, Jr., 55 and his co-conspirator girlfriend Ashley Kisla, 44 of Coushatta, LA were recently convicted by a federal jury for concealing assets from creditors during Rosbottom’s bankruptcy proceedings worth up to $2 million.  Both Rosbottom and Kisla are facing a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison along with hefty fines in relation to conspiracy and money laundering.

Rosbottom and Kisla were found guilty on a number of charges that included conspiracy to launder money for a fisherman boat and interest related to a private jet.  Rosbottom’s bankruptcy case is still pending in Louisiana. The convictions are focused on 17 cashier’s checks that were made out to Rosbottom totaling just over $1.8 million.  When Rosbottom filed his petition he failed to disclose the cashier checks to the Bankruptcy Trustee.

The federal jury reviewed an extensive amount of documentation that led to Rosbottom’s convictions which included 3 counts of concealing assets, 2 counts of giving a false oath, and one count of illegal transfer of assets.  He was also convicted of one count of conspiracy to commit bankruptcy fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering. Rosbottom may face 20 years in prison and a fine that is twice the amount of money included in the money laundering transaction.  He also faces 5 years in prison and a $250,000 fine for each convicted account.

Rosbottom’s girlfriend Ashley Kisla is also facing similar charges. She also faces 20 years in prison and a fine that is twice the amount of money included in the money laundering transaction.  She also faces 5 years in prison and a $250,000 fine for two convicted accounts. Both Rosbottom and Kisla are in custody and will be sentenced early January 2013.

http://www.ksla.com

avatar

About Reed Allmand

Website

Allmand's vision is rooted in his own financially precarious childhood in Abilene "My father always had difficulty holding a job and supporting our family, so after my parents divorced when I was 12, my sister and I got jobs to help make ends meet," he recalls. "I remember what it felt like as a child to worry that our car would be repossessed or home foreclosed on."

View all posts by Reed Allmand

Subscribe

Subscribe to our e-mail newsletter to receive updates.

FAQ

Why do I need to submit a new wage order when I modify my plan

When we modify your bankruptcy plan we are changing your plan payments. This means that we have to get with your employer and change the terms and amount of your wage order. The only way we can do that is by filling out a new wage order form.  

Learn More
What happens if the stay terminates on my home?

If the bankruptcy stay terminates on your home that means that even though your in bankruptcy, your creditor can pursue all there legal remedies they can pursue if you were not in bankruptcy. This includes foreclosure, and having your house sold and evicting you from your house.

Learn More

Find Location

map
  • Dallas Bankruptcy

    5646 Milton Street, Ste. 120 Dallas, Texas 75206
  • Fort Worth Bankruptcy

    860 Airport Freeway, Suite 401, Hurst, Texas 76054
  • More Locations

Meet Our Clients